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Poster: bluedevil Date: Jun 6, 2007 11:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fire on the Mountain... A different take...

If Rob Thomas is one of the most talented songwriters in contemporary music, then I'm the Lord himself walking on the water...

But I love Carlos, don't get me wrong. One of my favorite concert moments was during the Zebop tour (1981 or 82) where he opened the show by setting a little cassette player on a stool to play the radio "hit" of "I'm Winning" (or whatever the hell it was called) and then lettting that finish, the crowd that came for the hit got it, and then he launched into a 20 minute jam. LOTUS is one of the great albums. Carlos can make all the money he wants (and sell his brand of birkenstocks) and play with whomever he wants (I prefer his work with Wayne Shorter, Herbie and the like as opposed to making money for Clive and having his kids think he is "relevant"), but I am not prepared to give Rob Thomas his due...

Anyway, how's this for a take on fire?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYhyDUgK1U8

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Poster: cush212 Date: Jun 7, 2007 12:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fire on the Mountain... A different take...

Ashes to Ashes...

Fire from Fire...

87 gazinta 78...

Looks like this thread has completed it's circle...

:)

I'm still not sure what Rob Thomas has to do with any of this though???

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Poster: BryanE Date: Jun 7, 2007 3:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fire on the Mountain... A different take...

Hey, I didn't start it.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Jun 7, 2007 12:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fire on the Mountain... A different take...

"Anyway, how's this for a take on fire?"

...Was a fine nightcap!

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Poster: BryanE Date: Jun 7, 2007 9:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fire on the Mountain... A different take...

First off, if you're reading, cush, sorry for carrying on like this in a perfectly nice thread about a kickass video of Jerry, Carlos, Mickey, et. al., but I feel like responding. And not that any of this is really here or there or whatever, nor do any of us here probably give a shit one way or another about Rob friggin' Thomas of all people. But the statement "If Rob Thomas is one of the most talented songwriters in contemporary music, then I'm the Lord himself walking on the water..." has a condescending tone of disregard for what I've said that I don't appreciate. You can reject or accept it, but please don't dismiss it like I don't know what I'm talking about. The fact is that my job consists of listening to people like Rob Thomas for six hours a day, five days a week, and believe me, when I say he's one of the most talented songwriters in the business, I know of which I speak. Obviously you disagree, which is all well and good, although I can't objectively understand why you would. Write the guy off as middle-of-the-road, banal, too Top 40 for your taste, or whatever, and I am more than willing to go along with you. However, an unwillingness on your part to recognize the value of something on its own terms, whether it appeals to you or not, shows closed-mindedness. On the other hand, one could certainly never be able to describe Carlos Santana that way, which I mention since he is the central topic of the discussion. And that's a big part of my point yesterday in posting the reply to "Then again, Carlos did do a song with Rob Thomas ..."

Frankly, I'm a little confused by the comment "Of course, more likely a sense of now we play for clive than artistic merit ..." The nature of that remark seems grossly unfounded to me if for no other reason than the fact that neither Rob Thomas nor Matchbox 20 ever worked for Clive Davis directly. Thomas is on Atlantic Records and Matchbox 20 was on Lava, which is owned by Atlantic. Clive Davis has never been associated with Atlantic. He worked for years at Columbia, signing such theretofore unknown names as Pink Floyd, Bruce Springsteen, and yes, Santana. Big Brother And The Holding Company got a record contract immediately after Davis saw Janis's blistering performance at Monterey in 1967. Later in his career, Davis started the Arista label, and Carlos maintained his loyalty to him by jumping on board. And lest we forget, there was a little Top 10 number in 1987 called Touch of Grey that was also on Arista. Davis was able to recognize that The Grateful Dead were still very much a force to be reckoned with, and his decision to add them to his stable of artists, while others in the industry would have gladly ignored them as being has-beens, resulted in the Dead finally attaining deserved chart success that had eluded them for more than twenty years. Whatever Santana chose to do with Supernatural, an album replete with artistic merit in spite of selling a bazillion copies, rest assured he made his choices with a well-founded, long-standing trust in, and respect for, Clive Davis's guidance and experience.